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Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
Nov 20, 2012 5:30pm PST
, a longtime u.s. diplomat and mideast envoy, serving in the george h.w. bush, clinton, and obama administrations. he's now a counselor at the washington institute for near east policy. and khaled elgindy, a palestinian participant in the 2007 annapolis peace negotiations, and now a fellow at the saban center for middle east policy at the brookings institution. i want to start with you. your reading on where things stand tonight in termed of a pause or cease-fire. >> i do think the outlines of the cease-fire have probably been shapedded at this point. i think the secretary of state is there and has a chance to finalize this by, in a sense, becoming the, i think, the repository of the commitments that each side has made. i think one of the things that's going on right now is trying to make certain that all the understandings are understood the same way by each side and whatever promises are being made will now be promises made to her as well. in effect she becomes almost the holder of those as a kind of deposit. that, i think, is a chance for the cease-fire to actually be implement
Nov 6, 2012 4:30pm PST
the cliff, so to speak. some economists are saying that means that the u.s. economy goes into recession. >> well, i think we would go into recession, we'd exacerbate our unemployment, underemployment problems, unless it was reversed very quickly. but what a lot of people haven't focused on is, you know, it takes 60 votes to get something through the senate unless you use something called budget reconciliation, which only requires a majority vote. under current rules you can only use that if you're making the deficit less, not more. so if you try to reverse a tax increase or you try to reverse a spending cut, you're not going to be able to do that unless you have 60 votes. and that's going to be tough. >> susie: all right, we have american voters in the polls now who are going to decide who's the next president. but from your point of view, which candidate has the be plans to solve this fiscal crisis, if at all? we have less than a minute. >> in all candor, susie, neither one of them have lay out a comprehensive and credible plan to solve this problem. i will, however, say that i think t
Nov 4, 2012 10:00am PST
of the u.s. conference of catholic bishops, offered benedictions at both the democratic and republican conventions. for months, the bishops have led a vigorous campaign against the obama administration's policy mandating that employers, including many religious employers, offer free coverage of contraceptive services to their employees. the bishops accuse the obama administration of violating religious liberty. it's unclear how much those efforts have changed any opinions among voters. polls show catholics remain deeply divided, and that could be especially important in battleground states such as ohio, pennsylvania and florida. while much of the focus has been on the economy, green says here at the end of the campaign, other social issues may play an important role. >> there's some strong incentives for the parties to reach out for secondary issues. issues like women's rights, religious liberty, the environment, foreign policy. because if voters are evenly divided on their most salient issue, the economy, they're going to make their decision perhaps on some of these secondary issues.
Nov 6, 2012 5:00pm PST
that's at stake tonight. 33 u.s. senate seats, a third of the senate is up for grabs as well. 23 of those seats are currently held by democrats, 10 of them by republicans. in orr to take control of the senate, the republicans need a net gain of three or four seats, depending on who wins the presidency. here is what the associated press is project the so far this evening. in the state of delaware, that tom carper has won reelection. >> ifill: and in the state of florida, bill nelson, who actually had been running against connie mack, the son and grandson of the famous connie mack, he has also won reelection, even though connie mack had been making a late surge. >> woodruff: both of those democrats. in the state of maryland, another return this isenat ben cardin, returning for his second term. >> ifill: and in rhode island, sheldon whitehouse, a good friend of the president's, returning to the senate. >> woodruff: here we have a republican in the state of tennessee, bob corker re-elected to a second term. >> ifill: jeffrey brown will be watching the congressional races for us all n
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)